Read White Riot: Punk Rock and the Politics of Race by Stephen Duncombe Maxwell Tremblay Steven Lee Beeber Online

white-riot-punk-rock-and-the-politics-of-race

From the Clash to Los Crudos, skinheads to afro-punks, the punk rock movement has been obsessed by race. And yet the connections have never been traced in a comprehensive way.White Riot is the definitive study of the subject, collecting first-person writing, lyrics, letters to zines, and analyses of punk history from across the globe. This book brings together writing fromFrom the Clash to Los Crudos, skinheads to afro-punks, the punk rock movement has been obsessed by race. And yet the connections have never been traced in a comprehensive way.White Riot is the definitive study of the subject, collecting first-person writing, lyrics, letters to zines, and analyses of punk history from across the globe. This book brings together writing from leading critics such as Greil Marcus and Dick Hebdige, personal reflections from punk pioneers such as Jimmy Pursey, Darryl Jenifer and Mimi Nguyen, and reports on punk scenes from Toronto to Jakarta....

Title : White Riot: Punk Rock and the Politics of Race
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781844676880
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 336 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

White Riot: Punk Rock and the Politics of Race Reviews

  • Jessica Silk
    2018-11-17 13:30

    I am still reading this, but I wanted to share this review by Golnar Nikpour, which brings up some really important points:http://maximumrocknroll.com/white-rio...

  • Ryan Mishap
    2018-11-19 17:43

    An academic-leaning collection constructed around two pillars: 1)punk is self-consciously a white movement that seeks to either be in solidarity with people of color or in opposition, and, 2)punk is a mainly white movement that doesn't acknowledge its whiteness in a self-serving attempt at so-called color blindness.Of course, these two pillars are not the only monoliths seen in punk's city-scape, but they are the core of the collection, which runs from the seventies up to, roughly, the present. Many of the pieces are academic and/or from observers rather than participants. I would have liked to read more personal accounts but those are harder to fit in when looking at generalities and power structures.* I responded to many of the pieces in here, as I either agreed or disagreed to whatever degree and had my own take on the ideas and conclusions--thus the book is thought-provoking and worth anybody's time. I had read barely any of the stuff covering 70's punk and found I had read quite a bit of the stuff reprinted from the 1990's and so on. Here is where punk--always present in other countries beside the U.S. and Great Britain--really goes international with a vengeance thanks to the internet and other forces. This is where the book should have had more or at least another volume. The questions raised in the last couple pieces about how punk is exported/imported and appropriated or transformed by punks in other countries is fascinating. At any rate, this is totally worth reading.*One of the more frustrating things that came up in several of the essays was that the author would specify the time and place and people he was talking about--punk rock in L.A. circa '79, for instance--then proceed to make declarations about punk rock and what punks believe, extrapolating from the specified grouping without providing over-arching evidence.

  • Erin
    2018-12-07 13:42

    so i get it. this book tries. it really does. i, for some reason or another, had no idea this was an anthology, i guess i was hoping for a different book structurally. its thematic structure is problematic to me, if only because it was really difficult to get through a section called "white power" and not want to puke. there are some really great pieces in here, but i feel like they lack sufficient context and introduction – i want more explanation as to why these pieces are important and how they all work together to reach the book's aim. i wanted more from this than i got, but it's a good starting point.

  • Kent
    2018-11-14 19:32

    This was a really good read that explored, in depth, the way that race is perceived and dealt with in the punk subculture. This is structured as a reader, so there are many different writers and writing styles in this book. There are many excerpts from books, letters and interviews as well. The writings are from various time periods ranging from the mid 70's to the 2000's. It offers much insight to events and situations that one may not even think about when thinking of punk. Today, most think of punk as rather anti-racist with some factions of racist skin-head types, but there is much more to it than that. I would recommend this book to people who are interested in punk subculture and who also are into cultural studies and sociological type readings.

  • Kyle
    2018-12-05 18:31

    If you can get through the important but difficult-to-stomach extracts of overtly racist punk thinking, the book is a very rewarding read, offering up a variety of perspectives by anti-racists and people of color in and around punk scenes from around the world.

  • Andrew Nolan
    2018-11-18 20:27

    Fairly uneven, some of the analyses are pretty lacking. Mimi Nguyen's essay is as indispensable now as it was over a decade ago and needs to be read by everyone. Hard to get a sense of who the target reader is of this book.

  • Michelle
    2018-12-08 20:47

    Well, this just made the #1 spot on my 'to read' list!

  • Julie
    2018-12-15 19:45

    I predict a riot.I guess that now, with an alt-right (*cough*) rhetoric on the rise, raising awareness of racial issues in pop-culture (generally) and music (particularly) is becoming more and more crucial. Having had an interest in punk for most of my teenage and adult life, this book has been a bit of an eye-opener. My perception of punk had been influenced, mainly, by mid-to-late 2000s TV (notably VH1 and MTV2) - although not in a malign fashion, they did deliver the accepted 'whitestraightboy' discourse behind this music. And, lo and behold, there's so much more to it than meets the eye (and than what a 15-year old me refused to acknowledge at the time).Going from the UK to the US via Indonesia and South America, this anthology is split into various chapters, depending on the main theme. There are quite a few historic pieces, and it's really interesting to see how, by and large, nowadays pop-culture had 'romaticized' the original punk movement, which was as racist as can get. In hindsight, now I completely understand why Joseph Corre (Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood's son) decided to burn an insane amount of memorabilia a couple of months ago.Anyway, I digress. This book is worth a read if you want your believes challenged - it wasn't easy, at times, to come to terms with the fact that punk (or what's left of it) is still a male-dominated, occasionally racist and at times homophobic world. Will it ever change? Who the fuck knows.

  • Matt
    2018-12-06 14:24

    The structure of this book is eh. Some of the ideas that connect the pieces included are ok but some are pretty eh.This review explains it better than I could:http://maximumrocknroll.com/white-rio...Despite it's shortcomings there's a lot of eye-opening interviews here. Great stuff to process.